Heres how many seats each party holds on your local council

first_imgTHE 2014 LOCAL Elections have been marked by a radical shake-up in the parties that make up our county and city councils.The most notable aspect of this was the rise of Independents and Sinn Féin, with Fianna Fáil becoming the dominant party.Below is breakdown of each council, showing how its make-up has changed.These counts are either on-going, or recounts are being held:Fingal County CouncilLongford County CouncilLouth County CouncilMayo County CouncilMeath County CouncilOffaly County Council WESTMEATH: Fianna Fáil held up better than Fine Gael and Labour against the sudden appearance of Sinn Féin and Independents on the council.WEXFORD: Consisting of a range of parities unusually diverse for a county council, Fianna Fáil are the big winners here. Independents have also gained four more seats.WICKLOW: Labour lost two seats on this council, with Independents making the most significant gains.See a breakdown of each council and LEA here > See more detail here >Results are in for the following councils:CARLOW: Fine Gael retained a slight advantage in Carlow, with 2009′s 5-seat Labour presence on the council now split with Sinn Féin.CAVAN: Fine Gael’s majority was almost halved by Fianna Fáil’s resurgence. Sinn Féin remained unchanged.CLARE: Fianna Fáil slipped ahead of Fine Gael, having been neck-and-neck last year. The Green Party failed to regain a seat.CORK COUNTY: A significant change in the council’s make saw Fine Gael support dip, Fianna Fáil rise, and Labour collapse with a Sinn Féin surge from one seat to 10.CORK CITY: The Workers’ Party managed to retain their seat, with Labour’s 7-seat collapse being redistributed between Sinn Féin and the Anti-Austerity Alliance.DONEGAL: The biggest change in Donegal’s make-up was the Sinn Féin/Independent surge, both doubling their number of seats.DUBLIN CITY: Independents, Sinn Féin, and PBPA all saw their number of seats double, while the Green Party and AAA appeared on the scene. Labour’s presence shrunk from 19 to 8 seats.DÚN LAOGHAIRE – RATHDOWN: While Fine Gael, Labour, and PBPA retained close to their number of seats, Independents, Sinn Fein, and the Green rushed in to fill the void left as the council increased its number of seats by 12.GALWAY CITY: Aside from a one-seat increase for Independents, the main change was Sinn Féin zapping three seats from Labour.GALWAY COUNTY: Fianna Fáil, Sinn Féin, and Independents all increased their representation, with Fine Gael’s falling by one seat.KERRY: Sinn Féin, Fianna Fáil, and Independents all performed well – and, of course, the South Kerry Independence Alliance retained their seat.center_img KILDARE: While both Labour and Fine Gael managed to cling on, all other candidates capitalised on the 15-seat increase on the council.KILKENNY: The Green Party retained a seat on this council, with Sinn Féin gaining a foothold. The big winner was Fianna Fáil, knocking the coalition parties down a couple of seats.LAOIS: Fine Gael’s representation on the council halved, with Fianna Fáil dipping one seat and Sinn Féin gaining one.LEITRIM: Fine Gael votes fell by 6, spreading out nicely among the other three groups.LIMERICK: Independents and Sinn Féin both saw significant gains, leaving Fine Gael’s number of seats unchanged.MONAGHAN: The Castleblayney area will be repolled on 7 June following the sudden death of Councillor Owen Bannigan.ROSCOMMON: Fine Gael suffered a seven-seat loss as a result of the increase in size of this council.SLIGO: This is another constituency where the reduction in seats on the council was proportionate to Fine Gael’s losses.SOUTH DUBLIN: The big winners here are Sinn Féin and Independents – up 6 and 7 seats respectively, while AAA also made a significant impact.TIPPERARY: Independents doubled their representation, with a weak performance from both Fianna Fáil and Fine Gael.WATERFORD: Labour was all but squeezed out in the amalgamation of the two councils, while Independents dominated. Workers’ Party failed to retain their single seat.last_img

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *