OBITUARY Mario J Miani 94

OBITUARY Mario J Miani 94

first_imgNORTH READING, MA — Mario J. Miani, 94, of North Reading, formerly of Ansonia, CT, passed on Monday, May 6, 2019 at Windsor Place of Wilmington.Born in Derby, CT on August 9, 1924, son of the late Giuseppe and Giovina (DiGiovanni) Miani. He was a graduate of Derby High School, he attended 4 years at Bridgeport Engineering and 8 years of night school at Boston University.Mario was a Conceptual Design Engineer, he worked on Missile Re-entry Systems, space satellites, under sea technology and lasers. He worked for AVCO Systems Division in Wilmington for 16 years, AVCO Everett Research Division in Everett for 14 years and Science Research Lab for 5 years.Mario loved working on cars, especially Fiats and Chryslers, DIY projects and bowling. He loved the Patriots and most of all spending time with his family.He has been a resident of North Reading for over 61 years. He was a member of St. Theresa’s Church and the Knights of Columbus.Family members include his loving wife of over 66 years, Eleanor G. (Derry) Miani; He was a proud and loving father of three, Cathy Lynn Mizzell and her husband George of Birmingham, AL, Barbara A. Bochart and her husband Thomas of Tewksbury and Thomas J. Miani Sr. and his wife Joan of Methuen; he was the brother of the late Peter and Dino Miani and Hilda Testone; grandfather of 5 grandchildren, Elizabeth “Betsy” Colon, Andrew Bochart, Thomas Miani, Jr., Gina Miani, Robert Mizzell; one great grandchild, Tayla-Rae Colon; and his very close dear friend, Milan Tekula and his wife Dorothy of Saugus and many nieces and nephews.Visitation will be held at the Croswell Funeral Home, 19 Bow Street, North Reading on Friday, May 10 from 9 to 10:30 AM, followed by an 11 AM Funeral Mass at St. Theresa’s Church, 63 Winter Street (Rt. 62), North Reading. Interment will be in Riverside Cemetery in North Reading. Memorial donations may be made in his memory the American Cancer Society, 30 Speen Street, Framingham, MA 01701 or Hospice Services of Massachusetts, 391 Broadway Street, Everett, MA 02149.Mario J. Miani(NOTE: The above obituary is from Crosswell Funeral Home.)Like Wilmington Apple on Facebook. Follow Wilmington Apple on Twitter. Follow Wilmington Apple on Instagram. Subscribe to Wilmington Apple’s daily email newsletter HERE. Got a comment, question, photo, press release, or news tip? Email wilmingtonapple@gmail.com.Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… RelatedOBITUARY: Anthony Charles Mack, 78In “Obituaries”OBITUARY: Judith Elaine Sias Guertin, 76In “Obituaries”OBITUARY: Carl J.A. Anderson, Jr., 89In “Obituaries”last_img read more

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Suspect In Fatal Shooting Of San Antonio Detective I Lashed Out At

Suspect In Fatal Shooting Of San Antonio Detective I Lashed Out At

first_img Share CREDIT JOEY PALACIOS / TEXAS PUBLIC RADIOPolice have identified 20-year veteran Det. Benjamin Marconi as the officer fatally shot by a gunman Sunday.The suspect in the ambush shooting of a San Antonio police detective says he was angry about a child-custody battle and “lashed out at somebody who didn’t deserve it.”Otis Tyrone McKane was led by police past reporters as he was taken to Bexar County Jail in San Antonio late Monday. He told reporters that he was angry with the court system for not letting him see his son and took it out on Detective Benjamin Marconi.In his words, “I’ve been through several custody battles, and I was upset at the situation I was in, and I lashed out at someone who didn’t deserve it.” He said he wished to apologize to the family of the slain officer.The 31-year-old San Antonio man was arrested on a capital murder charge Monday afternoon in the fatal shooting of Marconi. The detective was shot as he sat in his vehicle Sunday after making a traffic stop. Authorities have said a gunman walked up to Marconi’s driver’s-side window and fired.Marconi was writing a ticket for a motorist at the time. Investigators have said that driver was not connected to the shooter.last_img read more

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The Gulf Of Mexicos Dead Zone Would Take 30 Years To Reverse

The Gulf Of Mexicos Dead Zone Would Take 30 Years To Reverse

first_imgGABRIEL C. PÉREZ / KUTA view of a fishing pier in Port Aransas.An oxygen-deprived “dead zone” in the Gulf of Mexico would take decades to reverse, according to a study from the University of Waterloo in Canada.The so-called dead zones form when water doesn’t have enough oxygen for fish and other marine life to survive, which researchers attribute to agricultural runoff along the Mississippi River – namely industrial fertilizers – that makes its way into the Gulf.Released last month, the study says, even if farmers were to completely stop the flow of runoff right now, it would take at least 30 years to dissipate.After the runoff makes its way into oceans, it causes overgrowths of algae. When the algae dies and decomposes, oxygen in the water gets absorbed along with it, forming so-called hypoxic zones, says Kim Van Meter, a postdoctoral fellow at the University of Waterloo and co-author of the study.“Fish can’t live there, and you can just end up with a massive die-off of the ecosystem,” Van Meter says.The dead zone in the Gulf of Mexico is the largest one ever recorded in the U.S. At nearly 9,000 square miles, it’s roughly the size of New Jersey. But, even though it shrinks in the winter months, researchers say it still seems to be coming back stronger every summer – which causes a lot of problems.  Despite that winter reprieve, the Gulf’s dead zone still causes irreversible damage to ecosystems, and there’s also a more lasting economic concern, Van Meter says.“Many communities around the Gulf Coast are dependent on both commercial and recreational fishing,” she says. “When you have these large dead zones, you’re really disrupting that industry.”Van Meter and her colleagues conducted the determine just how long it would take to fix the damage already done, finding it would still take at least 30 years to recover – even if 100 percent of fertilizer chemicals stopped flowing into the Gulf right now.But researchers say there is plenty the agriculture industry can do to significantly reduce the amount of chemical runoff. For one, farmers could start applying fertilizers more carefully or plant certain trees and shrubs to absorb chemicals before they get into waterways.Both authors say that, even if it does take decades to see results, it shouldn’t discourage attempts to fix the problem.“Like, when you go on a diet, if you’re doing all the right things and it’s staying the same, that’s very disheartening,” Van Meter says. “But if you understand it’s a long term proposition, I think it makes it a little easier to stay with the program.”Last year, a federal task force set a goal of shrinking the Gulf’s dead zone to fewer than 2,000 square miles by 2035, but unless major changes are made quickly, it isn’t likely that goal will be met.Read the study: Sharelast_img read more

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For the love of poetry

For the love of poetry

first_imgFor the lovers of the poetic tradition, the week promises to be an experience of a lifetime as over 38 poets from 20 Indian languages come together for a unique festival to celebrate Indian poetry.Presented by Delhi Government’s Department of Art, Culture & Languages and Hindi Academy, the ‘Bhartiya Kavita Bimb’ will be inaugurated by Chief Minister of Delhi Sheila Dikshit on 6 September, in the presence of Prof Kiran Walia, Minister for Education, Social Welfare, Women & Child Department, Languages and Prof Ashok Chakradhar, eminent Hindi poet and Vice President, Hindi Academy. Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’The ‘Festival of Indian poetry’ is an attempt to celebrate the richness of Indian languages and the compositions they are producing in an era of globalization and exchange when the West has had a major impact on the culture of the world.Eminent Hindi poets like Shri Arun Kamal, Shri Mohan Singh, Shri Rajkumar ‘Krishak’, Dr Prabha Pant, will share the festival stage with poets of all Indian languages including the likes of Dr Madan Gopal Ladha (Rajasthani), R Meenakshi (Tamil), Shri Shoaib Eaza (Urdu), Dr Kamini Kamayani (Maithili) and Sadhna Sanyal (Assamese), among several others. Also Read – Leslie doing new comedy special with NetflixThe festival will be held over two days and four sessions during which the poets will come together and recite some of their best works.The festival is a twin celebration of poetry and the emotions it evokes as well as the poetic evolution of various Indian languages and how they complement each other.’Be it in Hindi, English, Urdu or Tamil, poetry evokes a sea of emotions. With greater interactions and exchanges between different languages, poetic traditions also evolve over time and grow richer and more beautiful. It has been a tradition of our composite culture that every segment of it has imbibed values from parallel traditions.  Put in a nutshell, the different languages and cultures in India are so different, yet in a way they are also reflections of each other. This is what we are celebrating,’ says Dr Harisuman Bisht, renowned author and Secretary of Hindi Academy.In a way, the festival is also an attempt to present Indian poetry as a collective unit, rather than classify it into categories of Hindi, Tamil, Malayalam, Manipuri or Bhojpuri languages. In the opening session of the festival, noted critic Dr. Devendra Chaubey will also present his reading and vision of what Indian poetry as a collective will evolve into over the coming years.So, if you love the poetic traditions of India, do not miss the festival. It is a rare confluence of diversity and richness.last_img read more

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